Ivanwald, situated in a cul-de-sac at the end of 24th Street North in Arlington, Virginia, is the stronghold of a widespread “invisible” and powerful organization, working for “democracy” and “free markets,” but inreality extending the American empire.

Founded by a Norwegian immigrantAbraham Vereide(known as Abram) – now led by Doug Coe, the network – organized much like Ivanwald into cells of five, and “populated by elite, politically ambitious fundamentalists,” is the subject of Jeff Sharlett’s book: “The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power.”

The organization has operated under manyguises, some active, some defunct: National Committee for Christian Leadership, International Christian Leadership, the National Leadership Council, Fellowship House, the Fellowship Foundation, the National Fellowship Council, the International Foundation. These groups are intended to draw attention away from the Family, and to prevent it from becoming, in the words of one of the Family’s leaders, “a target for misunderstanding.”

Established in 1935 to oppose FDR’s New Deal and the spread of trade unions, the Family’s network spans the world organizing weekly prayer meetings at which the rich and powerful meet to advance their agenda.

The Family’s only publicized gathering is the National Prayer Breakfast – “attended by Pakistan’s famously corrupt Benazir Bhutto.” Its keynote is often delivered by an outsider. One such address was delivered by Saudi Arabia’s Prince Bandar.

Every president since Eisenhower has attended the National Prayer Breakfast Abram founded in 1953.

The Family, writes Sharlet, that hosts Prayer Breakfasts in public, in private preaches a gospel of “biblical capitalism,” military might, and American empire.

The following is a glimpse of the scope of the Family’s activities:

Marshall Green, American ambassador inIndonesia compiled for Indonesia’s president Suharto a “shooting list”: “the names of thousands of leftist political opponents, from leaders identified by the CIA to village-level activists, the kind of data only local observers – conservative missionaries, classically – could provide.” . . . Green and his men followed the results of their gift closely, checking off names as Suharto’s men killed or imprisoned them.A document in the Family’s archives titled “Important Dates in Indonesian History” notes that in March 1966, the Communist Party was banned and Campus Crusade arrived in April. Suharto wasn’t a Christian, but he knew that where missionaries go, investors follow. He also wanted to use God – any God – to pacify the population. In 1967, Congressman Ben Reifel sent a memo to other Fellowship members in Congress noting that a special message from Suharto calling on Indonesians to “seek God, discover His laws, and obey them” was broadcast at the same time as a Fellowship prayer session in the Indonesian parliament for non-Christian politicians.

By 1969, the Fellowship claimed as its man in Jakarta Suharto’s minister of social affairs, who presided over a group of more than fifty Muslims and Christians in parliament. Another Fellowship associate, Darius Marpaung – he’d later claim that God spoke through him when he told a massive rally that the time had come to “purge the communists,” an event that helped spark the massacre – led a similar group in Indonesia’s Christian community.

. . . in December 1975, when Portugal relinquished its claims to the tiny island nation ofEast Timor. It declared independence; nine days later Suharto’s army invaded, on the pretext that its neighbor was communist. Two hundred thousand people – nearly a third of the island’s population – were killed during the long occupation, to which the United States gave its blessing.

[Senator] Brownback said he’d met with King Abdullah about starting a fellowship group around the person of Jesus. . . . Abdullah let him know he’d made contact with the senator’s man and agreed to “fellowship” with him on a regular basis.

The Iraqis come up often, particularly with regard to their conversion … 900,000 bibles in the Arabic language [were] distributed by Christians inIraq.

David Kuo . . . and a few others transformed the Office of Faith-Based Initiatives into the very Republican vote-getting machine its critics had accused it of being from the start.

In 2002, “roundtable” events with faith and community leaders, organized by theOffice of Faith-Based Initiatives, “contributed to nineteen out of twenty victories in targeted races.”

The Family’s members include Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and former U.S. attorney general John Ashcroft, a leader in the Family, who maintained his prayer cell while presiding over the Department of Justice.

Senators Don Nickles (R., Okla.), Charles Grassley (R., Iowa), Pete Domenici (R., N.Mex.), John Ensign (R., Nev.), James Inhofe (R., Okla.), Bill Nelson (D., Fla.), and Conrad Burns (R., Mont.) are referred to as “members,” as are Representatives Jim DeMint (R., S.C.), Frank Wolf (R., Va.), Joseph Pitts (R., Pa.), Zach Wamp (R., Tenn.), and Bart Stupak (D., Mich.).

The Family operates through dozens of affiliates. One such affiliate has a townhouse next door to the Capitol – the C Street Foundation at 133 C Street SE in Washington, DC. Numerous affiliates are headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Organizations led by evangelists Billy Graham, Ted Haggard, Jerry Falwell, and others are affiliated with the Family.

It is estimated that 10 percent of the nation’s children are educated at home and in fundamentalist academies via curricula and books prepared by the Family and its affiliates.

At the National Prayer Breakfast on February 5, 2009, President Obama took the opportunity toannounce the creation of the White House Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. Representatives from some 120 countries were invited for the occasion.


Re the bombing/shooting in Norway, this is a reprint of Enver Masud’s 2009 article.