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The Freedom Bill

The Original Freedom Bill By The Liberal Democrats


By Dark Politricks

This is the original "Freedom Bill" that the Lib Dems promised to pass if they were elected to Government in the 2010 election that saw them share power with the Tories much to the disgust of us those on the left or who were old school Liberals who wanted liberty and freedom. They that knew bills like this one would be removed ASAP or at least watered down.

The original bill has been taken down from all Lib Dem websites, even the online archive.org doesn't seem to have a copy. If it does I cannot find it. It's almost as if they scrubbed it off the web once they realised their original bill below would not get passed and would be watered down due to Tory establishment pressure.

The Original Freedom Bill


Amend the law relating to detention of terrorist suspects, control orders and extradition arrangements; to make provision about identity cards, investigatory and surveillance powers, retention and use of samples; to make provision relating to the restoration of rights; to amend the criminal law and make provision regarding criminal trials; to amend data protection and freedom of information legislation; and for connected purposes.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: —

PART 1

TERRORISM ETC

CHAPTER 1

Detention of terrorist suspects

[Explanatory note]

1 Reduction of period of detention of terrorist suspects

(1) Sections 23 to 25 of the Terrorism Act 2006 (c.11) (extension of period of detention of terrorist suspects) ceases to have effect.

CHAPTER 2

Control orders

[Explanatory note]

2 Repeal of the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005

(1) The Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 (c.2) (orders against individuals involved in terrorism-related activity) is repealed.

(2) Sections 21 to 32 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 (c. 24) (suspected international terrorists) are repealed.

CHAPTER 3

Designation of part 2 territories

[Explanatory note]

3 Removal of the United States of America from part 2 territories

(1) In the list of territories in paragraph 3(2) of the Extradition Act 2003 (Designation of Part 2 Territories) Order 2003(S.I. 2003/3334) “the United States of America” is omitted.

PART 2

SURVEILLANCE POWERS

CHAPTER 1

Identity cards

[Explanatory note]

4 Repeal of the Identity cards 2006

(1) The Identity Cards Act 2006 (c.15) (which establishes the National Identity Register) is repealed.

CHAPTER 2

Surveillance powers and serious crime

[Explanatory note]

5 Amendment of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000

(1) The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (c.23) is amended as follows.

(2) In section 28 (authorisation of directed surveillance) for subsection (1) substitute -

“(1) The persons designated under this section may apply to a magistrate for a warrant for authorisation to carry out directed surveillance.”

(3) In subsection (2) of section 28 for “A person shall not grant an authorisation” substitute “A magistrate shall not grant a warrant”

(4) In subsection (3)(b) of section 28 for “detecting crime or of preventing disorder” substitute “detecting serious crime”

(5) In section 29 (authorisation of covert human intelligence sources) for subsection (1) substitute -

“(1) The persons designated under this section may apply to a magistrate for a warrant for authorisation to carry out directed surveillance.”

(6) In subsection (2) of section 29 for “A person shall not grant an authorisation” substitute “A magistrate shalll not grant a warrant”.

(7) In subsection (3)(b) of section 29 for “detecting crime or of preventing disorder” substitute “detecting serious crime.”.”

CHAPTER 3

Retention of fingerprints and samples

[Explanatory note]

6 Restrictions on the retention of fingerprints and samples

(1) That section 82 of the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 be repealed

(2) That section 9 and section 10 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 be repealed

(3) After section 64A of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (c. 60) insert—

Destruction of fingerprints and samples etc

(1) After a person is either not charged or acquitted of the offence for which a sample has been taken that sample shall be destroyed within one month of the fingerprints or samples being taken or the person being acquitted.

(2) This section applies to the following material—

(a) photographs falling within a description specified in the regulations,

(b) fingerprints taken from a person in connection with the investigation of an offence,

(c) impressions of footwear so taken from a person,

(d) DNA and other samples so taken from a person,

(e) information derived from DNA samples so taken from a person.

(3) For the purposes of this section—

(a) “photograph” includes a moving image, and

(b) the reference to a DNA sample is a reference to any material that has come from a human body and consists of or includes human cells.

CHAPTER 4

Establishment of a Royal Commission

[Explanatory note]

7 Royal Commission to recommend on the use and regulation of CCTV

(1) A Royal Commission is to be established to make urgent recommendations on the use and regulation of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) and the impact of CCTV on privacy.

PART 3

RESTORATION OF RIGHTS

CHAPTER 1

Right to protest in the vicinity of Parliament Square

[Explanatory note]

8 Repeal of offences restricting the right to protest in the vicinity of Parliament

(1) Omit sections 132 to 138 of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 (c. 15) (which regulate demonstrations in the vicinity of Parliament).

(2) In the Table in section 175(3) of That Act (transitional provision relating to offences) omit the entries relating to section 136.

(3) In paragraph 1(1) of Schedule 2 to the Noise and Statutory Nuisance Act 1993 (c. 40) (which is about consents for the operation of loudspeaker) omit “or of section 137(1) of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005″.

(4) Omit paragraph 64 of Schedule 6 to the Serious Crime Act 2007 (c. 27).

CHAPTER 2

Constitution of a public assembly

[Explanatory note]

9 Extension to the number of people constituting a public assembly

(1) Section 57 of the Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003 (c.38) (reduction in the definition of public assembly) ceases to have effect.

CHAPTER 3

Designated sites

[Explanatory note]

10 Repeal of offences of trespassing on designated site

(1) Omit sections 128 to 131 of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 (c. 15) (which creates an offence of trespass on designated site).

CHAPTER 4

Restoration of the right to silence

[Explanatory note]

11 Repeal of provisions which restrict the right to silence

(1) Omit sections 34 to 39 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 (c. 33) (which allows inferences from the silence of the accused).

PART 4

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROVISIONS

CHAPTER 1

Trials on indictment without a jury

[Explanatory note]

12 Repeal of provisions to allow for fraud cases to be conducted without a jury

(1) Omit section 43 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (c.44) (fraud trials to be conducted without a jury).

CHAPTER 2

Public interest defence for whistleblowers

[Explanatory note]

13 Restoration of the public interest defence for whistleblowers

(1) After section 7 (2)(b) of the Official Secrets Act 1989 (c.6) insert –

(c) and the government contractor can demonstrate that the disclosure caused more good than harm to the public interest before a court.

(2) After section 7 (3) (b) of the Official Secrets Act 1989 (c.6) insert –

(c) and the person can demonstrate that the disclosure caused more good than harm to the public interest before a court.

CHAPTER 3

Defendant’s bad character

[Explanatory note]

14 Repeal of provisions which allow evidence of a defendant’s bad character

(1) Omit sections 98 to 113 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (c.44) (evidence of bad character).

CHAPTER 4

Cases that may be retried

[Explanatory note]

15 Reduction in the number of cases that may be retried

(1) Omit schedule 5 paragraph 2 to 24 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (c.44) (list of offences for England and Wales).

(2) Omit schedule 5 paragraph 26 to 29 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (c.44) (list of offences for England and Wales).

(3) Omit schedule 5 paragraph 31 to 45 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (c.44) (list of offences for Northern Ireland).

(4) Omit schedule 5 paragraph 47 to 50 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (c.44) (list of offences for Northern Ireland).

CHAPTER 5

Taking control of goods

[Explanatory note]

16 Repeal of provisions which allow bailiffs to use force

(1) Omit schedule 12 paragraph 17 to 19 of the Tribunal, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007 (c.15) (powers for enforcement agency to use reasonable force).

PART 5

DATA PROTECTION AND FREEDOM OF INFORMATION

CHAPTER 1

Strengthening freedom of information

[Explanatory note]

17 Substantial prejudice in freedom of information

1 (1) In section 36 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (c. 33), in paragraph 2a after “prejudice” insert “substantially”.

(2) In section 36 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (c. 33), in paragraph 2b after “inhibit” insert “substantially”.

(3) In section 36 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (c. 33), in paragraph 2c after “would otherwise prejudice” insert “substantially” and after “be likely otherwise to prejudice” insert “substantially”.

2 After section 41 of the Data Protection Act 1998 (c. 29) insert—

“41A Assessment notices

(1) The Commissioner may serve a data controller with a notice (in this Act referred to as an “assessment notice”) for the purpose of enabling the Commissioner to determine whether the data controller has complied or is complying with the data protection principles.

(2) An assessment notice is a notice which requires the data controller to do all or any of the following—

(a) permit the Commissioner to enter any specified premises;

(b) direct the Commissioner to any documents on the premises that are of a specified description;

(c) assist the Commissioner to view any information of a specified description that is capable of being viewed using equipment on the premises;

(d) comply with any request from the Commissioner for—

(i) a copy of any of the documents to which the Commissioner is directed;

(ii) a copy (in such form as may be requested) of any of the information which the Commissioner is assisted to view;

(e) direct the Commissioner to any equipment or other material on the premises which is of a specified description;

(f) permit the Commissioner to inspect or examine any of the documents, information, equipment or material to which the Commissioner is directed or which the Commissioner is assisted to view;

(g) permit the Commissioner to observe the processing of any personal data that takes place on the premises;

(h) make available for interview by the Commissioner a specified number of persons of a specified description who process personal data on behalf of the data controller (or such number as are willing to be interviewed).

(3) In subsection (3) references to the Commissioner include references to the Commissioner’s officers and staff.

CHAPTER 2

Ministerial veto on freedom of information

[Explanatory note]

18 Repeal of ministerial ability to veto Information Tribunal decisions

(1) Omit section 53 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (c.36) (exception from duty to comply with decision notice or enforcement notice).

(2) In section 59 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (c.36) (appeals from decision of Tribunal), omit “on a point of law”.

CHAPTER 3

Children’s information databases

[Explanatory note]

19 Repeal of provisions to allow for the establishment of children’s databases

(1) Section 12 of the Children Act 2004 (c.31) (information databases) ceases to have effect.

(2) SI 2007 No. 2182, The Children Act 2004 Information Database (England) Regulations 2007 ceases to have effect.

CHAPTER 4

Parental consent

[Explanatory note]

20 Regulations to govern parental consent for taking children’s biometric samples

(1) The Secretary of State may make regulations to provide for the retention, use and destruction of material to which this section applies.

(2) The regulations must make provision as to the gathering of parental consent before material is taken from a person under the age of 16.

(3) This section applies to the following material—

(a) fingerprints taken from a person under the age of 16,

(b) DNA and other samples taken from a person under the age of 16,

(c) information derived from DNA samples so taken from a person under the age of 16,

(d) other biometric information as the Secretary of State thinks fit.

(4) The Secretary of State may make exceptions in the regulations in regard to —

(a) criminal justice,

(b) immigration.

PART 6

GENERAL

21 Commencement

(1) This Act comes into force at the end of the period of two months beginning with the day on which it is passed.

22 Short title

(1) This Act may be cited as the Freedom Act 2009.


The original freedom bill was posted at freedom.libdems.org but as soon as the Lib Dems got in shared power Government with the Tories and created a watered down The “Protection of Freedoms Bill” t hat basically only prevented private car parks from clamping your car, they took the original one down off all their Lib Dem controlled websites. You can see my response to their watered down bill they passed below.

This shows to me how embarrassed they were that they bent over and let the Tories water down their bill so much that it meant nothing at all. All the main parts they wanted to repeal are still in UK law suh as extradition to the USA - look at  Julian Assange. 

This bill would have been a great piece of law giving UK citizens their freedoms and civil liberties back. No wonder the establishment didn't allow them to introduce to parliament to vote on in this form.

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The Protection Of Freedoms Bill Is Missing Some Key Points

This was my response at the time to the bill being watered down and cleansed from the web. Politicians were deleting things they didn't want their voters to see from the web and all the archives many years back, so it is nothing new.

The Lib Dem’s published their much vaunted “Protection of Freedoms Bill” last week which you might not have heard about during all the news regarding Egypt. You can see a backup copy of the bill at that link and can compare the original bill above to what the bill they brought to the floor contained.

This bill was supposedly going to restore all those freedoms that Labour had removed during their decade of power and which many people had decried and saw as the creation of a high tech surveillance state within the UK.

You could have read the full bill here: www.publications.parliament.uk but it has been taken down which is why I reproduced it above. Even the wayback machine doesn't allow you to see a cached coy from 11yrs ago, responding with a 403 Forbidden error if you try and go to see a backup there. This is why I made the article above so that there would be a copy of the original Freedom Bill online bill despite Lib Dems attempts to remove it.

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But an overview taken from the libdemvoice.org is below and you can see the actual bill above.

An end to the routine monitoring of 9.3 million people under the radically reformed vetting and barring scheme.

Millions of householders protected from town hall snoopers checking their bins or school catchment area.

The scrapping of Section 44 powers, which have been used to stop and search hundreds of thousands of innocent people

The permanent reduction of the maximum period of pre-charge detention for terrorist suspects to 14 days.

DNA samples and fingerprints of hundreds of thousands of innocent people deleted from police databases

thousands of gay men able to clear their name with the removal of out-of-date convictions for consensual acts

Thousands of motorists protected from rogue wheel clamping firms.

An end to the fingerprinting of children in schools without parental consent.

The introduction of a code of practice for CCTV and Automatic Number Plate Recognition systems (overseen by a new Surveillance Camera Commissioner) to make them more proportionate and effective.

restrictions on the powers of government departments, local authorities and other public bodies to enter private homes and other premises for investigations and a requirement for all to examine and slim down remaining powers

The repeal of powers to hold serious and complex fraud trials without a jury.

The extension of the scope of the Freedom of Information Act and strengthening the public rights to data.

All good things and long overdue but it’s not exactly the bill we were promised is it?

You can read the original Lib Dem bill above this section seeing that the Lib Dem/Tory collation government took down any copy of the original after they watered it down. Maybe the owners of the site were so embarrassed that they took it down once they realised the massive discrepancies between the published bill and the one they wanted to publish?

A few of the most important freedoms that seem to be missing from this bill are:

The restoration of the right to remain silent when being questioned by the police. This was removed in the evil Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 which was brought in by the last Tory government and also banned outdoor raves and gatherings of more than a few people listening to music with a repetitive beat! If you want to know why the right to silence and a “no comment interview” is so important read this: http://www.darkpolitricks.com/p/a-guide-to-no-comment-interviews.html.

The restoration of all the rights to protest that have been removed including in Parliament square without first obtaining permission and the extension to the number of people constituting a public assembly which is used to determine whether the police come storming in dressed up like storm troopers or not.

Restoration of the public interest defence for whistle-blowers.

Repeal of provisions which allow evidence of a defendant’s bad character to be brought up in court.

Repeal of provisions which allow bailiffs to use force when they break into your house to steal your TV and DVD player because you can’t afford to pay the extortionate high interest on all those loans those banksters were throwing about during the good years.

And what about the change to the extradition treaty which has been signed with the USA that allows UK citizens to be sent off to the USA on the say so of a foreign entity without any prima facia evidence having to be shown in court.

This was supposed to be one of the main parts of the bill and was supposed to protect people like Gary McKinnon from being sent off in an orange jump suit on the say so of a US attorney. This unfair treaty has been brought into law over here but not in the USA and affords many more protections to US citizens being sought by our courts than to ours being sought by theirs. This treaty is a national disgrace and needs a fast remedy which the Freedom Bill was supposedly going to fix. Jut look at the CIA agent who recently ran down and killed Scottish teenager on a bike when she forgot to drive on the left side of the road.

In the recently published bill I seem to have missed all these important freedoms that were supposedly going to be restored. Maybe I have just misread the bill and these important acts were in such small print that I just missed them and if that is the case then please can someone point them out to me so I edit this article and restructure my complaint.

So as you can see whilst the Protection of Freedoms Bill is a good step in the right direction it is proof that fine words and talk of good deeds in opposition often fall by the wayside once power has been gained and other political pressures are brought to bear.

I don’t know whether the Tories fought hard against some of these dropped measures or whether they might be brought forward in bills of their own at a later date but it’s a big shame that some of the key parts of the bill that many people were looking forward to being introduced have been dropped from the first draft.

We will have to wait and see what form the final bill takes but if it doesn’t restore all our lost freedoms then the word should really be dropped from the title and it should be renamed “Restoration of those rights that we don’t mind that you plebs have back” bill.

......

2021 Update....

The bill that was actually passed was a very watered down bill with hardly any of our rights and civil liberties that have been removed since Blair became PM restored at all. We are still one of the most constantly monitored, surveilled and watched populations here in the UK. 

Privacy is a thing children of the future with their Smart Phones that are basically 365/24/7 monitoring devices that they even help the authorities by logging every move they make on Instagram or TikTok as well as giving the Government their GeoIP location constantly as their phone in one item that goes everywhere they do.


By Dark Politricks

© 2010 Dark Politricks

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